Home YOU ASK - WE ANSWER
Samsonite
Ask our travel experts about travel and get answers to reader questions
Q: Coronavirus Fear: Should I Wear Gloves While Traveling? PDF Print E-mail


I obey all the warnings about washing hands while dealing with dirty surfaces on the road and in the air. I’ll be taking a train trip next week and wonder if I should not only wash, but also put on gloves. Advice? JKH, New Amsterdam NY

A: If you have a sore or tender skin condition, to avoid infection, wear gloves. Also, with the current epidemic, no matter what your skin condition, it’s a good idea to wear tight plastic gloves when traveling, especially while using public toilets. Thoroughly wash hands and gloves as often as possible in hot, soapy water. Carry an extra pair so you’re always prepared for protection.

 
Q: Coronavirus Fear: Should I Wear Gloves While Traveling? PDF Print E-mail


I obey all the warnings recommending washing hands while dealing with dirty surfaces on the road and in the air. I’ll be taking a train trip next week and wonder if I should not only wash, but also put on gloves. Advice? JKH, New Amsterdam NY

A: If you have sore or tender skin, wear gloves. No matter what your skin condition, it’s a good idea to wear tight plastic gloves when using public transportation, especially when using public toilets. Thoroughly wash hands and gloves as often as possible in hot, soapy water. Carry an extra pair so you’re always prepared for protection.

 
Q: Confused By Travel News Reports: Will My Flight Fly Or Not? PDF Print E-mail


With the ever-changing info about airline and other travel schedules, I don’t know how to handle it. Is my trip on or off? How do I deal with the confusion? PJJ, New Rochelle NY

A: Flight schedules are now often changed or cancelled. And because of the coronavirus hysteria, sometimes as frequently as hourly. For several hours before you leave for the airport for your scheduled flight, check online with the airline at least once every 30 minutes before you leave home to the airport.

If you’re told the flight is cancelled, stay home and/or book the best schedule you can get that day. When there’s no satisfactory reschedule, start the refund request. Remember this is happening much more frequently these days, so be as patient as possible with the situation, as well as  endure just about anything else related to travel.

 
Q: Coronavirus Scare Plus Stock Market Crash: What Can I Do? PDF Print E-mail


With the world in a panic, what do you recommend for a confused and worried senior trying to make plans for springtime travel? JRMcK, San Antonio TX

A: The first impulse may be to hide under your bed and hope it will all go away soon. Seriously, more practical and economic ways may be to plan a driving trip to the Grand Canyon or a U.S. seashore destination. One positive part of the confused economy now is that gasoline prices are dropping dramatically.

Airline, cruise and hotel prices are also less because of loss of business due to the coronavirus panic and cancellations. If you’re determined to travel, check on some of the best bargains in years. However, be aware and take care of personal cleanliness and safety when you’re on the road, at sea and in the air.

 
Gripe: Why Do Coach Airline Seats Keep Getting Smaller? PDF Print E-mail


Q: For business, I fly often and necessarily as cheap as possible. At six feet three inches tall, I’m getting more uncomfortable each time I travel by air. It’s because of greedy airline jam us into ever smaller spaces. How can I avoid it? PLJ, Memphis TN

A: Of course, it’s inconvenient painful and potentially dangerous for big passengers. If there must be a quick evacuation, there’s the danger of being unable to get out of your seat in a hurry. The best advice to find more reasonable fares to fly in larger spaces is to keep checking for special prices, such as midweek and red eye flights. Also, choose to cut back on other travel expenses and pay for the pricier seats when you fly.

 
«StartPrev12345678910NextEnd»

Page 1 of 69
 
Stay in-the-know about the latest Sports, Life, Money, Tech, and Travel stories. You'll get your first 2 months of USA TODAY for $25 (charged monthly). All print subscribers receive the e-Newspaper included with their subscription.